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Soft deck in cockpit
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8/15/2019 at 2:15:12 PM GMT
Posts: 22

The white was just the primer but I also liked it a lot.  I considered sticking with it but in the end I decided to go with the conventional "sundown buff" from Interlux.  Hopefully it doesn't need to be cleaned as often as white would.

As for materials, here is what I used for the sole.  It doesn't include stuff I bought to do the cabin bulkhead or benches in the future.  There was also some PT lumber and rough cut locust which I used for modifications to the stringers.

- 10 yards of 12oz biaxial fiberglass (50in wide roll) for the skin over the plywood.  It was the perfect amount for two layers.  A slightly narrower roll would have been OK, too, as there was quite a bit of overlap in some places.
- 21 yards of 6oz woven fiberglass tape (6in wide roll) for the tabbing between the sole and the hull.  This was just enough for two layers all around the sole.
- 2 sheets of 4ftx8ft 1/2in marine grade plywood for the sole. 
- 2 cans of West System filleting blend for the fillets between the sole and the hull.
- About a gallon worth of microspheres which a friend gave me.  I used them for faring the sole.
- About 3 gallons of West System epoxy.  In hindsight, I think I should have just bought the larger container.  It would have saved me some trips to the marine supply shop and probably a bit of money.

If you plan to do the benches or stringers then you'll need 3/4" plywood (like you said).  You could probably do all of the stringers with two sheets.   I am pretty sure that the benches can both be cut from a single sheet.



8/27/2019 at 10:05:12 PM GMT
Posts: 30
Your post was most timely! I picked up a 50 inch wide roll of fiberglass and a roll of tape last week. Once my plywood order arrives, I can start the next phase of the overhaul.

My seats were half inch plywood, so I will go with that.

Joe


5/28/2020 at 4:40:26 PM GMT
Posts: 30

I finally have the new cockpit sole in place, and am about ready to lay a layer of 6 oz fiberglass and several coats of epoxy over it.  My seats are cut out and glassed, and I have new stanchions from Marshall.  The original construction was to fasten them to cleats on the bulkhead and transom, support them on the inboard side with the two stanchions, and tape the outboard edge to the hull. 

I wonder about taping the outer edge, and whether it might be better to bring out the seats about 3 or 4 inches, and glass two stringers to the side of the hull, to mimic hull ribs.  I can use 3/4 inch marine ply for the job, dressed in fiberglass and epoxy goo.  I can then bridge the stringers to the stanchions with 1x1 hardwood to create an additional support.  This would enable me to remove the seats more easily for maintenance, and to allow extra drainage.  I understand that it would be a place for small objects and debris to collect, but I think the benefits would outweigh the disadvantages in the long run.  


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5/28/2020 at 4:40:26 PM GMT
Posts: 30

I finally have the new cockpit sole in place, and am about ready to lay a layer of 6 oz fiberglass and several coats of epoxy over it.  My seats are cut out and glassed, and I have new stanchions from Marshall.  The original construction was to fasten them to cleats on the bulkhead and transom, support them on the inboard side with the two stanchions, and tape the outboard edge to the hull. 

I wonder about taping the outer edge, and whether it might be better to bring out the seats about 3 or 4 inches, and glass two stringers to the side of the hull, to mimic hull ribs.  I can use 3/4 inch marine ply for the job, dressed in fiberglass and epoxy goo.  I can then bridge the stringers to the stanchions with 1x1 hardwood to create an additional support.  This would enable me to remove the seats more easily for maintenance, and to allow extra drainage.  I understand that it would be a place for small objects and debris to collect, but I think the benefits would outweigh the disadvantages in the long run.  


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5/28/2020 at 4:59:52 PM GMT
Posts: 22
I've been wrestling with similar ideas for my seats. Please post pictures of whatever you do. I'll be going another season without seats as I am still making repairs to my cabin bulkhead and I want to get her in the water asap.


5/28/2020 at 5:00:29 PM GMT
Posts: 22
Great work by the way. Having done that job myself, I know how much work it is and commend anybody who takes it on.


5/28/2020 at 6:50:14 PM GMT
Posts: 30
Thank you! Hard as it is, I have enjoyed the work. I will post pictures.

Have you been sailing without seats?


5/29/2020 at 12:17:00 PM GMT
Posts: 22
Yes. I sailed the last few weeks of last season without them and it looks like I’ll be doing it again this year. I just pretend I’m in an old clamming or fishing catboat. Don’t think they wasted valuable cockpit space on benches! It’s pretty fun sailing her while standing up anyway.

When that game wears off we lean on the gunwale or sot on a cooler or something like that.


5/30/2020 at 5:04:55 PM GMT
Posts: 30
I am sitting in my cockpit as I type this. I think that my modification should work, but in the event that it doesn’t, I guess I can go without seats for a while.

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6/22/2020 at 3:00:59 PM GMT
Posts: 30
This weekend I brought the new seats down to the boat and fit them. I was surprised to see them slide into place without complaint. All the measuring really paid off. They are 9mm meranti with 6 ounce fabric on both sides and several layers of epoxy. I screwed In cleats of 1x1 mahogany to bulkhead and transom and after to measure the bullnoses while my yard workers took a break to go after perch. When all the fitting is done, I will take everything apart, glass the screw holes and put it back together again.

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