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5/1/2019 at 3:11:08 PM GMT
Posts: 16
J. Seymour,

My cabin bulkhead has the same rot as yours above the sole level. I plan to replace it with 1/2" marine plywood. Below the sole, I was surprised to find that it is still in decent shape. I thought for sure that it would be worse.

In the Good Old Boat article mentioned earlier in this thread they had the same issue as you in the bulkhead/stringer below the sole level. They repaired it pretty much how you described. It's worth purchasing the article if you haven't already. They have some good descriptions as well as photos of how they did the repair.


5/2/2019 at 12:57:40 PM GMT
Posts: 18
I do indeed have that article. It's a good one. Funny, I must have read that section three or four times, but it never made sense until I started poking around the real thing.

I don't think it will be as hard to repair as I thought.



5/31/2019 at 9:52:50 AM GMT
Posts: 18
SOFT DECK IN COCKPIT

Unfortunately, emergency surgery and a business trip caused me to curtail my spring overhaul.

Here are a few photos that I hope will help others.

Most of the softness was in the forward section of the sole.  I noticed it when I bought her, so I knew that I would be making the repair eventually.  When I removed the fiberglass, I was glad that I did.  A previous owner added lockers in this area.  Someone had also added a replacement panel at some point.  It can bee seen in the photo that shows part of the companion It appears  to have been painted with some dull grey or white compound.  The replacement panel is still in good shape.  It was not scarfed into the original sole, and appears to have been supported by struts and partners.  The plywood all around it, however, is in very bad shape.  I will cut away all of the plywood that is not solid and replace with a good quality marine plywood.  There was no plywood left under the glass under the seat.  I will cut all of it away, sand it down, and apply new plywood, with two coats of epoxy, and then reglass on top.  I will scarf or step the new joint.  The other photos show that the stringer is gone-- it looks as though someone cut out a section, perhaps to run wiring.  I will take that out and cut a new one, applying two coats of epoxy.  Another stringer has some rot, but appears sound.  I plan to slather on some CPES, followed by two coats of epoxy.  

One question goes through my mind-- should I look for more rot that I can't see or feel, or should I cut away until I hit solid wood and sound glass, make the repair, and go sailing?

Joe


 Attached Images:

6/24/2019 at 9:59:51 PM GMT
Posts: 16

I struggled with deciding how much wood to cut out as well.  I decided to cut out only what was wet or clearly rotten and leave what still had strength and was bone dry.  It's a slippery slope and had I taken everything that showed signs of water damage I would have been rebuilding the whole boat.  I feel pretty good about my approach and am confident that what I have done will last quite while.  The reality it that this is a common problem on these boats and if we live long enough the job will need to be done again not matter what we do.  Why not do it as quickly as you reasonably can and go sailing?

The structure in your boat looks quite different from mine.  Seems like the modifications in yours were extensive.  As you'll see in my photos, I only made minor changes.  First, I added a stringer down the center to fasten the two halves of the sole  and prevent differential deflection (not having this seems to be what caused the hole in my floor and the rot that followed with it).  Second, I added cleats along the cabin bulkhead to support the forward end of the sole (mine was held up in that location only by a bit of mat fiberglass and tabbing and was quite soft/bouncy).  Lastly, I cut out and replaced a large portion of the forward-most stringer with epoxy coated hardwood because it was too damaged. It all got at least two coats of epoxy to stabilize things and limit the spread of future rot. 

One more thing that I struggled with was whether to simply screw down the sole as it was done by Marshall or add cleats and glue as is pretty common these days.  In the end I decided to stick with the stainless steel screws because it is simple and I liked how easy it was to disassemble piece by piece without tearing up the stringers.  It lasted over 30 years that way and I'd be happy if it got me even close to that again.

 Attached Images:

6/25/2019 at 1:22:04 PM GMT
Posts: 18

T. Moorhoff,

I will follow your advice and cut away the wet or rotten wood until I get to dry, solid wood.  That might mean that I have to replace the whole thing, or it might not.  I will then treat what is left with either CPES or epoxy, and then proceed with the overhaul.  I also agree that what worked for Breck Marshall will work for me.  I hope. So I will screw down the new sole by pre-drilling oversized holes, filling them with epoxy, and then drilling smaller holes.  

The modifications were pretty extensive.  A previous owner added four lockers-- two under the sole, on either side of the centerboard trunk, and two in the cabin just forward of the companion (see attached).  The centerboard lockers were made by cutting through the bulkhead.  The first photo is looking through the cut I made in the sole, and shows the runners for a drawer, with the centerboard trunk and the edge of the cabin table visible in the background.  The second photo shows what the forward lockers looked like The starboard bulkhead is completely gone-- I will have to measure that space and cut a new one.  I will probably install a watertight access port, instead of reinstalling those lockers.  I would like to add a small electric bilge pump with float switch down in that void.  I will leave the other two lockers in place, as they do not appear to be doing any harm.

Last weekend I took out the starboard seat.  Even though it looks pretty sound, I will probably replace it.  I saved the two stanchions.  I can strip them and refinish as needed.  To remove the seats, I used a Dremel tool with the 670-01 mini circular saw attachment.  It enabled me to get into the small spaces, and it cut through the layers of fiberglass tape that held the seat on.  This week, I hope to take out the other seat, and remove more of the bulkhead and sole. 

Joe


 Attached Images:

7/29/2019 at 7:17:25 PM GMT
Posts: 16
Repair Update

For those who are interested, here's an update on the repair I am doing.  The last time I posted I had just put the sole back down but had yet to install the fillets, tabbing, or fiberglass.  I've now completed all of those steps and am working on fairing everything to prepare for a proper finish. 

I've been using epoxy thickened with micro-spheres as a fairing material but think that I should have gone with something a bit simpler like TotalBoat's Total Fair product.  The labor required to mix epoxy and filler is far more than the fairing process itself and the thickened West System is almost too strong to sand, even with the low-density mocro-spheres.

Anyway, the good news is that I am getting closer by the day.  I've been tempted to just move on, slap on some topside paint and go sailing but I know that I'd regret that.  So a few more days of back breaking epoxy and sanding it is.  

I hope to be on the water before the end of August.  Just in time to be hauled back out!

Click on the photos for a better view.


 Attached Images:

8/3/2019 at 2:06:18 PM GMT
Posts: 18
Soft deck in cockpit

Looks good. 

I have not gotten that far along this season.  Yesterday, I finished ripping out the bulkhead and sole, and shoveled out all of the flotation.  Now I need to measure the inside curve of the old sole, and then remove what is left.  As it turned out only the aft stringer was rot-free, and the rot that was on the others was down in the bilge, so I suppose I will have to remove all of that.  Per the Good Old Boat article, I will replace one stringer at a time, using the next existing stringer as a brace.  I plan on using fir due to cost and strength, although I find okoume tempting.  


 Attached Images:

8/11/2019 at 8:31:10 PM GMT
Posts: 16
Good on you for doing it "right".  My stringers also had some staining which is probably the early stage of dry rot.  They were still pretty solid, though, so I decided to just dry them out and cover them in a couple of coats of thin epoxy to keep them stable and limit the spread of whatever was on them.  They absorbed the epoxy well and I believe that they'll last quite a while longer. 

Also, are you doing the work on the water?  The background of your photo is a bit blurry but it sure looks like you are floating to me.  If so, even more impressive!

As for my project, I've been getting pretty down on myself about it as the summer wanes.   I finally started painting today and that sure changed my outlook on life!  I can almost see the finish line now!  

I've attached a pic after applying Interlux Prekote.  I was planning to paint the cockpit the traditional sand color but after seeing this I think I quite like white.  I may just do that instead and keep the beige for the bulkhead and the mast, both of which I am perfectly happy leaving until next year.

 Attached Images:

8/11/2019 at 8:31:14 PM GMT
Posts: 16
Joe, good on you for doing it "right".  My stringers also had some staining which is probably the early stage of dry rot.  They were still pretty solid, though, so I decided to just dry them out and cover them in a couple of coats of thin epoxy to keep them stable and limit the spread of whatever was on them.  They absorbed the epoxy well and I believe that they'll last quite a while longer. 

Also, are you doing the work on the water?  The background of your photo is a bit blurry but it sure looks like you are floating to me.  If so, even more impressive!

As for my project, I've been getting pretty down on myself about it as the summer wanes.   I finally started painting today and that sure changed my outlook on life!  I can almost see the finish line now!  

I've attached a pic after applying Interlux Prekote.  I was planning to paint the cockpit the traditional sand color but after seeing this I think I quite like white.  I may just do that instead and keep the beige for the bulkhead and the mast, both of which I am perfectly happy leaving until next year.

 Attached Images:

Last edited Sunday, August 11, 2019
8/15/2019 at 1:21:04 PM GMT
Posts: 18

Thank you.  I'm trying to get it right.  I owe the boat that much. 

 

Yes, I've been doing the whole thing in the water. It keeps me nimble, and it makes me careful, especially with borrowed tools. 

I like the white. I will probably paint everything a light tan, like my spars, but the white give the cockpit a nice clean look. I also like the placement of your mainsheet block. I had always wished for a block like that in the center of the cockpit, until I actually got one and realized how much space it takes up. Maybe I will look into remounting mine there.

I will buy plywood this weekend. I think that three sheets of half inch, and a sheet of 3/4 inch should do. I think that twelve yards of 6 ounce (60" width), and 50 yards of six inch tape ought to cover it.

I will post an update next week.

Joe




Last edited Thursday, August 15, 2019
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